Weekend Wonderings

Written April 6th, 2014 by Ken
Bruno

G Bruno

Welcome to this week’s edition of Weekend Wonderings. Basketball season is over, if you’re an Ohio State fan. And probably if you’ve gotten into any NCAA pools, as well. The Spring sports are well under way, and we have some time before OSU’s Spring Game. Grab whatever beverage that you need and let’s proceed.

The James/Wexner

An Overview of the BR-002 Trial in Breast Cancer:

Julia White, MD, professor, director, Breast Radiation Oncology, vice chair, Clinical Research, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the BR-002 trial, which will evaluate the rate of complete tumor ablation of breast cancers that are less than or equal to 2 centimeters.

Ablation refers to local methods that destroy the tumor without removing it. Ablation treatment of tumors does work. They do a tremendous job of it at The James.

Keeping up:

If you want to keep current with cancer research and treatment at The James, you can sign up to their blog.

Commentary

Again, I owe this week’s inspiration to PZ Myers. His article is based upon an interview that the web site Polygon had with several principals of Phoenix Interactive, regarding start-up funding difficulties to develop and bring their new video game, Bible Chronicles: The Call of Abraham , to market. The game is based upon the life and times of Abraham.

Bible Chronicles: The Call of Abraham is an action-RPG in which you play as an attendant in Abraham’s party. You witness Biblical events, and play a role in the overall group’s adventures, fetching, fighting and questing. God appears from time-to-time.

You really need to click through to the Myers and Polygon articles to get the full flavor, I can’t do it justice. Their attempt to crowdsource funding, via Kickstarter, didn’t do well. They only reached 20% of their funding goal, so investors weren’t emptying their pockets to get in on the ground floor of this venture. So, why was there such a funding failure? Were potential investors not enamored with the game’s story line, its graphics, PI’s business plan? Nope. The the owners/founders of PI attribute the funding failure to the machinations of Satan. Yep. Not because of any shortcoming on their part; there are supernatural shenanigans going on. This funding and development issue rests at the feet of The Fallen Angel.

So, all this, obviously got me wondering.. What could Phoenix Interactive done differently to move their project a bit farther up the curve of being a viable product? Caveat; since I’m not as tuned into the literalism of the plot, I really can’t offer any advice on that topic. However, I do have some suggestions, but first, a hint at their target market:

 “Those families are also going out after Sunday services, driving to Wal-Mart, and buying Call of Duty or Grand Theft Auto games. We’re not oblivious to that. But we can give them an alternative to what they’ve accepted from the mainstream media when it comes to video games.”

I’ll have more to say on this  in a bit, but let’s plunge forward.

The title is all wrong. Bible Chronicles: The Call of Abraham. Look, you’re either “all in” or you’re “out”. The title conveys a blend of Chronicles of Narnia and the Call of Duty franchise. It’s not sending a clear message. Below are some suggestions.

  • Abraham’s Call of Duty
  • Bible Chronicles: Abraham, The Filicide Chapters 
  • Bible Chronicles: Abraham’s H.A.L.O. [A nice aura to it, no?]

There, that should be a start. Since the crowdfunding results were pretty dismal, I suggest the Phoenix Interactive owners try again with a bit more focus on the appropriate investor profile. Perhaps they should arrange with various churches in the Bakersfield environs to take special collections to fund whatever they decide to call their video game.

Now of course, the PI management team could actually accept responsibility for this product development/launch fail, but if they can pin this on nefarious cosmic hanky-panky, I doubt they own up to their own shortcomings. It’s so much more satisfying to blame “the other”.

Sunday’s Song

From 1976, Bob Dylan with a live performance of Idiot Wind.

 

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