Weekend Wonderings

Written March 30th, 2014 by Ken
Bruno

G Bruno

Welcome to this week’s edition of Weekend Wonderings. The basketball season is over for both the men’s and women’s teams, Spring football practice has begun and we are only a couple weeks away from the Spring Game. Grab whatever beverage that you need and let’s proceed.

The James/Wexner

We have a couple of items this week.

  • Here is an example of research work at the James being commercialized, via a licensing agreement, as an avenue to get their research results available for general medical treatment, as well as provide some economic benefit to Ohio State.

The Ohio State University, through the Ohio State Innovation Foundation, has signed an exclusive world-wide licensing agreement with MedVax Technologies, Inc., for the licensing of groundbreaking cancer peptide vaccine technologies.

The anticancer vaccine technologies are designed for the treatment and prevention of cancers associated with the HER2 protein. These include breast, ovarian, lung, colon and pancreatic cancers, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The commitment by MedVax will allow innovative clinical trials for various cancers to be conducted in the near future.

  •  Sometimes knowing what doesn’t work is very valuable, too.  The results of this study show the importance of follow-up studies done by a research university such as Ohio State. Rather than accept that an anti-cancer agent “works” and be done with it, this study points up the distinct possibility that in some patients, it may actually cause cancer growth.

Anticancer agents that target a cell-cycle regulatory protein to inhibit tumor growth might actually promote the development and progression of certain B-cell lymphomas, according to a new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center.

The study indicates that inhibiting CDK4, a regulator of the cell cycle, promotes genetic instability and the development or progression of B-cell lymphomas that are driven by the MYC oncogene.

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Weekend Wonderings

Written January 26th, 2014 by Ken

teacherWelcome to this week’s edition of Weekend Wonderings. The basketball teams are swimming upstream right now, and the current is strong. We see the destination, we need to just keep stroking.  Grab whatever beverage that you need and let’s proceed.

The James/Wexner, Cleveland Clinic

This is “virus” week on Weekend Wonderings. Let’s start with a brief refresher. From Berkeley Wellness article on August 2012:

“One in every six cases of cancer worldwide can be attributed to viruses and other infectious agents, a new study from the International Agency for Research on Cancer has confirmed.”

Which leads us to findings that the HPV virus can damage genes:

“Our sequencing data showed in vivid detail that HPV can damage host-cell genes and chromosomes at sites of viral insertion,” says co-senior author David Symer, MD, PhD, assistant professor of molecular virology, immunology and medical genetics at the OSUCCC – James.

“HPV can act like a tornado hitting the genome, disrupting and rearranging nearby host-cell genes,” Symer explains. “This can lead to overexpression of cancer-causing genes in some cases, or it can disrupt protective tumor-suppressor genes in others. Both kinds of damage likely promote the development of cancer.”

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Weekend Wonderings

Written November 3rd, 2013 by Ken
chimp_skull

Wondering

Welcome to the latest edition of Weekend Wonderings. Take a minute, grab whatever you drink on a Sunday afternoon/evening and let’s carry on. I’ll wait..

The James/Wexner, etc

As expected, we have a couple items this week. First, a profound article on research results associated with ‘cancer wasting’, where body mass (mostly lean) is loss. This condition (cachexia) is responsible for one fourth of cancer deaths. The body just wastes away.

A new study reveals that tumors release factors into the bloodstream that inhibit the repair of damaged muscle fibers, and that this contributes to muscle loss during cancer wasting. The condition, also called cancer cachexia, accompanies certain types of cancer, causes life-threatening loss of body weight and lean muscle mass, and is responsible for up to one-in-four cancer deaths. There is no treatment for the condition.

Obviously, ‘no treatment’ status is pretty serious. However, that fact that this research indicates a cause of this condition is a significant step towards moderating and dampening this effect. Truly, if not for Ohio State..

Don’t forget to drink your coffee. Since I drink a lot of coffee, this is reassuring. And for non-coffee drinking, a bit of advice. Read More