Weekend Wonderings

Written March 30th, 2014 by Ken
Bruno

G Bruno

Welcome to this week’s edition of Weekend Wonderings. The basketball season is over for both the men’s and women’s teams, Spring football practice has begun and we are only a couple weeks away from the Spring Game. Grab whatever beverage that you need and let’s proceed.

The James/Wexner

We have a couple of items this week.

  • Here is an example of research work at the James being commercialized, via a licensing agreement, as an avenue to get their research results available for general medical treatment, as well as provide some economic benefit to Ohio State.

The Ohio State University, through the Ohio State Innovation Foundation, has signed an exclusive world-wide licensing agreement with MedVax Technologies, Inc., for the licensing of groundbreaking cancer peptide vaccine technologies.

The anticancer vaccine technologies are designed for the treatment and prevention of cancers associated with the HER2 protein. These include breast, ovarian, lung, colon and pancreatic cancers, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The commitment by MedVax will allow innovative clinical trials for various cancers to be conducted in the near future.

  •  Sometimes knowing what doesn’t work is very valuable, too.  The results of this study show the importance of follow-up studies done by a research university such as Ohio State. Rather than accept that an anti-cancer agent “works” and be done with it, this study points up the distinct possibility that in some patients, it may actually cause cancer growth.

Anticancer agents that target a cell-cycle regulatory protein to inhibit tumor growth might actually promote the development and progression of certain B-cell lymphomas, according to a new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center.

The study indicates that inhibiting CDK4, a regulator of the cell cycle, promotes genetic instability and the development or progression of B-cell lymphomas that are driven by the MYC oncogene.

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Weekend Wonderings

Written September 29th, 2013 by Ken

 

 thinking chimp

Welcome to the latest edition of Weekend Wonderings. Take a minute, grab whatever you drink on a Sunday afternoon and let’s carry on.

The James/Wexner

As mentioned last week,  I’m a big believer/supporter of genetic/molecular diagnosis and treatments of cancer. In concert with Charles’ fine article, here is the latest with OSU medical research regarding lung cancer. This is significant, because lung cancer is a brutal disease. To start, lung cancer is the 2nd most prevalent cancer. Interestingly, there are more cases of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, but with a 70% mortality rate, lung cancer patients aren’t as prevalent. Sadly enough.
DoubleHelix

Researchers at the (OSUCCC – James) have discovered that levels of the gene microRNA-31 (miR-31) predict the spread of the most common form of lung cancer to nearby lymph nodes.

They found that high levels of miR-31 in primary tumor cells predicted lymph node metastasis and poor survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Low expression levels were associated with the absence of metastases and excellent survival.

“Our findings suggest that microRNA expression in the primary lung tumor can estimate whether the tumor has spread to the lymph nodes and can help direct patients to the most appropriate treatment,” says principal investigator Tim Lautenschlaeger, MD, a researcher in Radiation Oncology and the OSUCCC – James Experimental Therapeutics Program.

This process gives researchers and treatment providers a much clearer picture of the disease, which determines treatment protocols. Once the treatment protocol is determined, the patient has a better chance of recovery, or at least holding the course.

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